TBS Network's The Emperor's Cook swept the major trophies at the 8th International Drama Awards in Tokyo back in 2015. Aside from the Grand Prix (Best Drama), Satoh Takeru, Kuroki Haru, and Suzuki Ryohei won major acting awards as well. 

The Emperor's Cook - Review, Part 2

In Part One, we have an introduction and some historical notes. Let's have a recap, shall we?

Based on the novel "Tenno no Ryoriban" by Sugimori Hisahide, it tells the story of Akiyama Tokuzo (1888-1974) who served as Emperor Taishō's and later Emperor Shōwa's Imperial chef. He is regarded as an influential figure in spreading French cuisine in Japan and is also referred to as the "Japanese Escoffier".

Tokuzo is a spoiled brat, who is notorious, annoying and easily gets bored on any activity he joins out of curiosity. His strict father and diligent mother had almost given up hope on whether he can be reformed, but his niiyan (eldest brother) remains his staunchest supporter. Forced into a marriage of convenience, Tokuzo, instead became passionate about cooking when he had his first taste of beef cutlet. Even in his pursuit of becoming the "Best cook of the Empire of Japan", his arranged wife took it upon herself to support him. Trained in Tokyo, and later in Paris, France, he learned the many secrets and wonders of cooking amidst discrimination, hardship, and rejection. He overcomes it all to be appointed Emperor's Cook at the young age of 25.

The awards and impressive reviews bestowed on TBS's The Emperor's Cook - 天皇の料理番 (released in 2015) may be regarded as unprecedented when it comes to a foodie drama. As it tackles very important milestones in Japanese history, it also puts the spotlight on the status of cooks and chefs in recent Japanese society.

The Emperor's Cook - Review - Part 1

Based on the novel "Tenno no Ryoriban" by Sugimori Hisahide, it tells the story of Akiyama Tokuzo (1888-1974) who served as Emperor Taishō's and later Emperor Shōwa's Imperial chef. He is regarded as an influential figure in spreading French cuisine in Japan and is also referred to as the "Japanese Escoffier".